Years ago, many people kept journals to record the highs and lows of their lives. These were usually very private and not offered up for public viewing. Today, however, people in New Jersey and everywhere else want others to know what they did, where they did it and with whom. How times have changed. Updating social media has become part of the daily routines of most people, many of whom do not realise the role this will play in a divorce.

While the evidence provided by photographs taken by private investigators, handwritten letters, messages on answering machines and emails were upon what many divorce battles were built years ago, social media is an open book for lawyers and judges today. Social media evidence is used in many divorce cases, mainly when dealing with child custody and property division battles. The discovery process is also easier because a parent who boasts about a new car on social media will not be able to plead poverty when it comes to child support.

There are some ground rules to remember. An image on Facebook of a parent having an innocent drink with friends can portray him or her as a habitual drinker. Also, all social media friends might not be real friends — one never knows in whose corner they are. Regardless of how careful a person is with posting on social media, he or she can be tagged by others without being aware of it. So those who are active on social media should know that nothing is private anymore.

Remember that deleting a post does not remove something that has been passed on by others. Furthermore, every time a person likes something on social media, it becomes part of his or her digital footprint. Any New Jersey spouse who has questions about how that digital footprint will play a part in his or her divorce can get the answers from an experienced divorce attorney.

Source: kctv5.com, “Social media posts have serious consequences for divorcing couples“, Ellen Mcnamara, Nov. 16, 2017