Most couples in New Jersey and elsewhere assume their marriages will last a lifetime. Some analysts say certain markers signify a greater chance of divorce. If a particular couple begins their married life in a traditional setting, then shifts roles at some point, the bond they once shared may take a big hit.

When one spouse is the sole breadwinner in a family and the other stays at home full time, it’s understandable that both spouses get used to the routine. If the stay-at-home spouse decides to pursue a career and winds up earning as much as, or more than, the spouse who has been working outside home all along, it may cause turbulence in their relationship. If that spouse is no longer available (or willing) to take care of at-home tasks, and the spouse who has been working throughout the marriage can’t (or won’t) step in to help, things may go awry in the marriage.

Some spouses feel threatened by this type of role change, especially if they have thought of themselves as the sole providers for their families. On the other hand, a spouse may also decide to cut back on work hours if his or her partner starts adding income to the household; if the spouse decreasing a workload doesn’t pick up slack on the home front, tempers may flare. Resentment tends to build in marital relationships where someone feels unappreciated or that his or her feelings are disregarded.

Unresolved negative emotions, feelings of inequality and disagreements about each person’s role in a marriage can cause irreparable damage. Some New Jersey couples overcome such obstacles by seeking counseling or talking to other couples who have successfully risen above similar challenges in their relationships. Others determine the most viable solution to a breakdown in communication is to divorce, in which case outside support is also a great asset to have on hand, especially if legal issues arise.

Source: CNBC, “Why you may be more likely to get divorced – and what you can do about it“, Nanda Davis, Accessed on April 25, 2018